3DEP, LP360 Toolbox and AirGon

I am looking for the month of May – it seems to have disappeared without a trace!

We recently visited with the Tennessee Office of Information Research (OIR) in beautiful Nashville, Tennessee. The OIR is the coordinating state agency for a USGS 3DEP LIDAR (3 acronyms in a row – not quite a record!) acquisition project. Under this program, the state of Tennessee will be flown at Quality Level 2 (2 points per square meter) over a four year period. The initial collection (slated for this fall) will encompass some 11,500 square miles, covering 27 counties.

3DEP is an excellent opportunity for state and local government agencies to pool their financial (and often technical) resources to obtain point cloud data. By spreading the cost across a spectrum of stakeholders, a surprisingly large amount of data collection can be accomplished.

Our discussions with the OIR led naturally to a conversation about how LIDAR data are used in GIS and engineering departments. We covered the usual suspects such as flood plain analysis, basic 3D visualization, site planning and so forth. By the end of the conversation, I was convinced (as usual) that every single state and local government GIS workstation should have access to a current image and current 3D (e.g. LIDAR point cloud in LAS format) backdrops. Why would anyone find it acceptable to be without a cross-sectional view of their municipal data on an ad hoc basis? Mainly because they have never had this level of information available. You never miss what you have never had!

When we returned to the office, we decided to put together, once and for all, a package of material for folks who are either contemplating acquiring LIDAR data or those who have access to LIDAR data. We will develop use cases and return on investment information for the range of applications that make sense for these data. If you have some novel ideas and particularly case studies, please work with us. Obviously we want to sell more software but we believe a rising tide lifts all boats. We need to get the tide (meaning the understanding and effective use of LIDAR data) rising first!

Speaking of software, we hope to have our experimental release (EXP) of LP360 available for download by the end of this month (June). The developers are doing fine. It is me who always throws a wrench in the delivery schedule – “let’s get return selection added to the new Live View dialog before we release…” Speaking of Live View, this is a new dynamic filter in LP360 that lets you change class, return and flag filtering on the fly. You are really going to like this new feature!

While we try to make features in our tools easy to use, the LIDAR tools on the market still tend to be toolbox oriented rather than workflow specific. For this reason, it is very important to participate in training if you hope to realize a maximum return on your investment. We offer a range of training (and consulting) from web based to on-site. In addition, we have our Huntsville-based LP360 training coming up in the fall.

On the AirGon side of things, we have been talking to a lot of potential clients who can make immediate use of small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) mapping. We offer a complete helicopter-based metric mapping kit in the AV-900 MMK. This is garnering a lot of interest since it provides a turn-key solution of hardware, software and training for doing jobs that have an immediate high return on investment such as stockpile volumetric analysis. However, we also offer just the piece parts for those who wish to assemble their own system. For example, if you have decided on a small wing type sUAS such as the eBee from SenseFly, LP360 for sUAS is still your best option for extracting volumetrics (anyone who has tried to do a multi-pile site using the point cloud generation software shipped with these systems will readily agree!). In addition, AirGon Reckon is the best product in the market for hosting and delivering mine site orthos and volumetric reports. By hosting our volumetrics delivery system in Amazon Web Services, we relieve you the need to worry about data delivery to multiple offices, data backup and security.

Summer promises to fly by just as quickly as the spring. We are attending a number of conferences such as the ESRI meeting and the Transportation Research Board AFB-80 summer meeting. If you are attending one of these, please look us up. See you in July!

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Drones, Metric Mapping and RTK

We have been very busy this first third of 2015 with software development (as we always are).  The thing about software is that it is never static.  It is either undergoing new additions or entering the end of life phase.  We have had a very big focus on ensuring that our products are optimized for LAS 1.4 support as this is the new requirement of the USGS.  Additionally, we like to use LAS 1.4 in our mine site workflows since it supports a few nice capabilities that were not in LAS 1.3.

This is definitely the year of the drone.  Every major geospatial hardware firm has announced a drone system for remote sensing (some for metric mapping).  While the USA is inching along toward some usable drone rules, other countries have clear rules in effect and drone mapping is becoming a standard survey/mapping tool.

We are garnering a very high interest in AirGon’s Metric Mapping Kit (MMK).  This solution provides everything you need to do uncontrolled mapping projects using a small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS) except a processing laptop computer.  Add in your own surveyed control points to reach survey grade accuracy.

Speaking of the Metric Mapping Kit, we will be hosting a AV-900 MMK workshop in Toronto, Canada on June 11th and 12th.  Thanks to Jim Giordano, we will be presenting live flight demonstrations at VicDom Sand & Gravel as well as an in-depth look at mission planning and post-collection data processing.  Our focus will be on drone-collected volumetrics. Personal protection equipment (steel toed boots, hardhat, safety vest and safety glasses) are required.  Remember that a passport is required for travel between the USA and Canada.  Space is extremely limited so sign up early!

We have been (in a joint project with Applanix, a Trimble Company) researching the use of Post-Processed Kinematic (often erroneously called Real Time Kinematic, RTK) control solutions.  Obviously everyone flying a sUAS for metric mapping purposes would like to dispense with the tedium of deploying ground control.  We will publish the results of our efforts as a white paper when the work is complete.  My goal is a recipe, if you will, of the methods that are appropriate for a given desired accuracy level.

We will be posting an experimental (EXP) release of LP360 (all license levels) within the next few weeks.  Those of you on software maintenance will be able to download this release via the “Check for Updates” option under LP360 Help.  There is a separate article in this newsletter that provides a highlight of the new features.

Till June – Best Regards,

Lewis

GeoCue Group News – May 2015

sUAS – Where will this business go?

The small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) business is very appealing. For less than US $20,000, you can outfit a complete system for collecting aerial imagery and processing the data into an array of high quality mapping product.

But who will roll out these new low cost mapping systems?  Will it be the major airborne acquisition companies?  Perhaps, but with a business model predicated on large collects, does this fit?  Will it be the owners of the sites that require mapping such as quarry owners, land developers, coal fired power plants?  Or will it be professional land surveyors who offer sUAS mapping as another tool in their toolbox?

In my mind, the professional surveyor is best equipped to roll out this new business tool.  The PS is already tuned to a business model of travelling to small sites, collecting  data, processing results and consulting with the client.  The sUAS will provide a new tool that will allow the PS to offer a broader range of more accurate services to the client base.  For example, rather that delivering estimated elevation models based on a few RTK points, she can now deliver very dense point cloud derived models based on dense image matching.

Perhaps the most exciting new business opportunity is the rapid collection of accurate volumetric data.  Today this is done either by manned aerial mapping or by ground based techniques.  Ground based techniques are very problematic for many situations since accurate data collection of complex or tall stockpiles is very difficult.  Manned airborne methods work extremely well but are prohibitively expensive for high frequency monitoring (even quarterly monitoring is not practical except for the most valuable of stockpiles).  Enter the sUAS.  A flight of 20 minutes can provide the base data necessary for very detailed volumetric computations over a typical 1 square kilometer area.  In fact, the entire process, from mission planning to client deliverable can be performed in less that one day.

The sUAS is upon.  Enterprising folks will figure out very quickly how to produce professional products at a profit.

(Read the GeoConnexion article describing our experience of putting together an sUAS system.)