What We Do

Since this is our first general distribution newsletter in a few years (see the introduction), I thought it would be a good idea to review a bit of the history of GeoCue Group Inc. and what we do.

 

We formed the company under the name NIIRS10 (that’s another story!) in July of 2003.  Thus this is our 14th birthday!  Prior to forming this company, I was the CEO of Z/I Imaging, a global photogrammetry hardware and software company.  Z/I was acquired by Intergraph in 2002 (the point at which I left the company).  Intergraph was, of course, subsequently acquired by Hexagon, the new home of Z/I Imaging.  Our core group of developers joined me from Z/I and thus have a long and rich history in developing advanced photogrammetric and LIDAR hardware and tools.

The first product set of GeoCue (at that time, NIIRS10) was GeoCue, a set of enterprise workflow management tools aimed at organizations who need to manage professional LIDAR and photogrammetric workflows.  GeoCue was rapidly adopted by most LIDAR production companies (in those years, primarily airborne laser scanning, ALS) in North America where it remains strong to this day.

Most of our LIDAR workflows encompassed the Terrasolid processing toolset.  This caused us to form a close relationship with Terrasolid OY of Finland.  In 2005, Terrasolid asked us to become their North American distributor, providing software, training and maintenance.  This, too, we maintain to this day.

In 2009, we recognized that LIDAR was being exploited, to a small degree, by end users of LIDAR data such as federal, state and local governments.  We quickly entered this business by acquiring QCoherent Software LLC of Colorado Springs, Colorado.  QCoherent was the company that initially developed LP360, an ESRI extension that allowed advanced exploitation of point cloud data directly in an ArcGIS desktop environment.  We quickly internalized this product and developed a robust standalone version for use outside ArcGIS.  Since that time, LP360 has become the standard for LIDAR exploitation (especially QC) in a great many agencies including the USGS, the USACE, the USDA, Forest Service, many water management districts and so forth.  LP360 is the desktop LIDAR tool against which all others are judged.

In 2012, we entered the small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) or “drone” business with the aim of bringing tools such as LP360 to bear on the point clouds produced by dense image matching.  After a very careful evaluation (from an accuracy and model conformance point of view) we selected Agisoft PhotoScan and Pix4D Mapper as the tools of choice for point cloud generation.  We developed agreements with these two companies and began sales and support of these products.  We also started down the path of adding powerful sUAS mapping tools to LP360, such as volumetric analysis.

In 2014 we began development of a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) post-processed kinematic (PP)K) direct geopositioning system for our high-end drone, the AV-900.  This resulted in the AirGon Sensor Package (ASP), one of the most accurate positioning systems for rotary wing drones. The ASP is based on a Septentrio GNSS engine specifically designed for sUAS operations.  Since we were effectively entering a new market, we decided to launch this through a wholly owned subsidiary, AirGon LLC (www.airgon.com).  We also developed an Amazon Web Services (AWS) drone products hosting site called AirGon Reckon.  Reckon serves as a data repository and information sharing portal for companies with multiple mapping sites (particularly the aggregate mining industry).

In 2015, AirGon began offering limited drone services for companies who were testing the waters of drone-based mapping but did not want to internalize the operations until the workflows and products were proven.  Our aim is not to compete with our customers, of course, but to evangelize this game changing technology.  We were early to receive an FAA 333 exemption and had certified Part 107 Remote Pilots a few days after that new rule went in to effect.  We have now flown over 600 missions with a wide variety of potential drone users from aggregate mining to paper mills.

Since we have been in business, we have always done some amount of bespoke software development when that development advanced our commercial products.  These bespoke activities ranged from funded additions to our core software all the way to custom workflow solutions.  An example is a very high throughput LandSat change detection system developed for MDA Information Systems.  This system is controlled and managed by a GeoCue Distributed Processing System.

In 2015, we entered into an agreement with Teledyne Technologies (specifically Teledyne Brown Engineering) to develop an Amazon Web Services based system to manage and disseminate data from their Multi-User System for Earth Sensing (MUSES), a multi-sensor host platform mounted on the International Space Station.  This development, the Earth Sensor Portal (ESP), is being offered as a commercial hosting platform for data from satellite imagery to LIDAR data.

We saw a resurgence of interest in mobile laser scanning (MLS) in late 2016/early 2017.  Our MLS software suite had a bit of a hole in that we did not have a package specifically aimed at asset collection from MLS data.  We have been aware of the Orbit offerings from Orbit GT of Belgium for some time.  Earlier this year, we re-evaluated their offering and signed on as their North American distributor.

 

So this brings us to the present!  We now focus on several business areas:

LIDAR – Both Production and exploitation.  Our portfolio includes:

  • The GeoCue product family for workflow management from production to QC.
  • The Terrasolid family of products for industrial strength geometric correction and processing of both ALS and MLS data.
  • LP360 for high performance data editing, QC and specialized functions such as hydro modeling on the product side and a rich exploitation environment (in ESRI and standalone) on the LIDAR consumer side.
  • Orbit GT for feature extraction from MLS data.
  • LIDAR Server for local data management/distribution.
  • Earth Sensor Portal for enterprise data hosting and dissemination.

sUAS (Small Unmanned Aerial Systems) – Data collection, processing and management.  These offerings are via our AirGon subsidiary.  The main thing to remember about AirGon is that we can bootstrap you into the drone mapping business and we can do it in a very cost effective yet completely professional manner.  Our offerings include:

  • Agisoft PhotoScan, Pix4D Mapper – software for generating point clouds and orthomosaics from drone collected imagery.  We offer the software, support and training.
  • LP360 (sUAS licensing level) – The same LP360 as used for LIDAR.  We offer it at a lower price point for small area mapping, such as with drones.  LP360 provides the full workflow from point cloud ingest (point clouds from imagery and LIDAR) to derived product output.  This is really the most powerful tool kit on the market for processing drone data where the desired outputs are high accuracy mapping products.
  • Bring Your Own Drone (BYOD) Mapping Kit – this is a kit of PhotoScan, LP360, a Reckon subscription and comprehensive training that enables data production from any drone.  It has a special emphasis on mapping using low cost DJI drones such as the Inspire 2 or the Phantom 4 Pro.  The BYOD plus a DJI is a great starting point for entering the drone mapping business and we train you in how to be successful.
  • AirGon Reckon – our AWS-hosted data dissemination system for drone data.  This is a great tool for service providers who want to deliver data in a professional, cloud hosted manner to their customers.  Service provider partners can actually use Reckon as a revenue generator for their business.
  • LOKI – This is the most exciting product we have developed in the hardware arena in some time.  It allows you to add PPK direct geopositioning to a Phantom 4 Pro, an Inspire 2 or any drone with a camera equipped with a flash hot shoe.  There is a separate article in this newsletter regarding LOKI.  Add this to a BYOD and you truly will have a professional mapping kit with direct geopositioning using low cost DJI drones!  This is a financial game changer.

ESP (Earth Sensor Portal) – ESP is an Amazon Web Services hosted platform for LIDAR, Imagery and related products.  It is a great dissemination platform for agencies who acquire data such as LIDAR and need it securely backed up and made available to stakeholders (including the public) via a web facing portal.  ESP includes the idea of workflow so agencies can have us integrate in, for example, a QC workflow, allowing their collection contractors to post data directly to their ESP portal.   This is a subscription model that offloads all need for server technology as well as concerns of your own firewall being maliciously penetrated via your data portal.  This is exciting stuff!!

Bespoke Solutions – GeoCue continues to offer custom development when it adds value to our strategic product portfolio.  For example, if you need a niche tool added to LP360, consider discussing a bespoke addition with us. It will show up in the standard code base, maintained as part of the global product.  This prevents you from getting stuck in the situation of having to contract specifically for updates.  On the larger side of the equation, we have developed very large projects for various clients, primarily around LIDAR/imagery data processing, management and dissemination.

 

As you can see, we have a complete product set for several different imagery/LIDAR related production and exploitation scenarios.  We are very happy to entertain your inquiries ranging from simple product questions to those difficult things you encounter in your workflows.  So please keep us in mind when you are thinking of adding a workflow or improving the ones you have.

 

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3DEP, LP360 Toolbox and AirGon

I am looking for the month of May – it seems to have disappeared without a trace!

We recently visited with the Tennessee Office of Information Research (OIR) in beautiful Nashville, Tennessee. The OIR is the coordinating state agency for a USGS 3DEP LIDAR (3 acronyms in a row – not quite a record!) acquisition project. Under this program, the state of Tennessee will be flown at Quality Level 2 (2 points per square meter) over a four year period. The initial collection (slated for this fall) will encompass some 11,500 square miles, covering 27 counties.

3DEP is an excellent opportunity for state and local government agencies to pool their financial (and often technical) resources to obtain point cloud data. By spreading the cost across a spectrum of stakeholders, a surprisingly large amount of data collection can be accomplished.

Our discussions with the OIR led naturally to a conversation about how LIDAR data are used in GIS and engineering departments. We covered the usual suspects such as flood plain analysis, basic 3D visualization, site planning and so forth. By the end of the conversation, I was convinced (as usual) that every single state and local government GIS workstation should have access to a current image and current 3D (e.g. LIDAR point cloud in LAS format) backdrops. Why would anyone find it acceptable to be without a cross-sectional view of their municipal data on an ad hoc basis? Mainly because they have never had this level of information available. You never miss what you have never had!

When we returned to the office, we decided to put together, once and for all, a package of material for folks who are either contemplating acquiring LIDAR data or those who have access to LIDAR data. We will develop use cases and return on investment information for the range of applications that make sense for these data. If you have some novel ideas and particularly case studies, please work with us. Obviously we want to sell more software but we believe a rising tide lifts all boats. We need to get the tide (meaning the understanding and effective use of LIDAR data) rising first!

Speaking of software, we hope to have our experimental release (EXP) of LP360 available for download by the end of this month (June). The developers are doing fine. It is me who always throws a wrench in the delivery schedule – “let’s get return selection added to the new Live View dialog before we release…” Speaking of Live View, this is a new dynamic filter in LP360 that lets you change class, return and flag filtering on the fly. You are really going to like this new feature!

While we try to make features in our tools easy to use, the LIDAR tools on the market still tend to be toolbox oriented rather than workflow specific. For this reason, it is very important to participate in training if you hope to realize a maximum return on your investment. We offer a range of training (and consulting) from web based to on-site. In addition, we have our Huntsville-based LP360 training coming up in the fall.

On the AirGon side of things, we have been talking to a lot of potential clients who can make immediate use of small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) mapping. We offer a complete helicopter-based metric mapping kit in the AV-900 MMK. This is garnering a lot of interest since it provides a turn-key solution of hardware, software and training for doing jobs that have an immediate high return on investment such as stockpile volumetric analysis. However, we also offer just the piece parts for those who wish to assemble their own system. For example, if you have decided on a small wing type sUAS such as the eBee from SenseFly, LP360 for sUAS is still your best option for extracting volumetrics (anyone who has tried to do a multi-pile site using the point cloud generation software shipped with these systems will readily agree!). In addition, AirGon Reckon is the best product in the market for hosting and delivering mine site orthos and volumetric reports. By hosting our volumetrics delivery system in Amazon Web Services, we relieve you the need to worry about data delivery to multiple offices, data backup and security.

Summer promises to fly by just as quickly as the spring. We are attending a number of conferences such as the ESRI meeting and the Transportation Research Board AFB-80 summer meeting. If you are attending one of these, please look us up. See you in July!

Drones, Metric Mapping and RTK

We have been very busy this first third of 2015 with software development (as we always are).  The thing about software is that it is never static.  It is either undergoing new additions or entering the end of life phase.  We have had a very big focus on ensuring that our products are optimized for LAS 1.4 support as this is the new requirement of the USGS.  Additionally, we like to use LAS 1.4 in our mine site workflows since it supports a few nice capabilities that were not in LAS 1.3.

This is definitely the year of the drone.  Every major geospatial hardware firm has announced a drone system for remote sensing (some for metric mapping).  While the USA is inching along toward some usable drone rules, other countries have clear rules in effect and drone mapping is becoming a standard survey/mapping tool.

We are garnering a very high interest in AirGon’s Metric Mapping Kit (MMK).  This solution provides everything you need to do uncontrolled mapping projects using a small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS) except a processing laptop computer.  Add in your own surveyed control points to reach survey grade accuracy.

Speaking of the Metric Mapping Kit, we will be hosting a AV-900 MMK workshop in Toronto, Canada on June 11th and 12th.  Thanks to Jim Giordano, we will be presenting live flight demonstrations at VicDom Sand & Gravel as well as an in-depth look at mission planning and post-collection data processing.  Our focus will be on drone-collected volumetrics. Personal protection equipment (steel toed boots, hardhat, safety vest and safety glasses) are required.  Remember that a passport is required for travel between the USA and Canada.  Space is extremely limited so sign up early!

We have been (in a joint project with Applanix, a Trimble Company) researching the use of Post-Processed Kinematic (often erroneously called Real Time Kinematic, RTK) control solutions.  Obviously everyone flying a sUAS for metric mapping purposes would like to dispense with the tedium of deploying ground control.  We will publish the results of our efforts as a white paper when the work is complete.  My goal is a recipe, if you will, of the methods that are appropriate for a given desired accuracy level.

We will be posting an experimental (EXP) release of LP360 (all license levels) within the next few weeks.  Those of you on software maintenance will be able to download this release via the “Check for Updates” option under LP360 Help.  There is a separate article in this newsletter that provides a highlight of the new features.

Till June – Best Regards,

Lewis

GeoCue Group News – May 2015

April 2015

We’ve had a very busy first quarter with many road trips and demonstrations of technology. I continue to remain very excited with respect to small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS or drone) technology. Applied to the right sort of problem, this is a real game changer.

We just attended the SPAR conference in Houston last week. SPAR is a conference with a primary focus on tripod (static) laser scanning and secondary foci on mobile laser scanning and an emerging section on sUAS technologies. The conference was attended by perhaps 1,000 folks. We were exhibiting as AirGon in the UAS section of the exhibit hall. If you are involved in building information management (BIM), this is a must-attend conference.

I made an interesting observation regarding the emergence of sUAS technology for mine site mapping.  It reminds me a lot of the years when tripod laser scanning was emerging and replacing total station surveys in brown field as-built documentation projects. sUAS mapping is the logical choice for volumetric mapping at mine sites. While it has some disadvantages, its pluses put it ahead of any other technique for this sort of application. For the first time, I encountered service providers who are using other approaches to solve this problem. Many of those who are using tripod scanning for volumetrics feel threatened by this newly emerging technology. Who can blame them? If I had just invested 80K in a laser scanner for volumetrics and then observed a technology much more suited to the task, I would be defensive as well! Thus I am seeing end-users (e.g. mine owners) as the parties most embracing of sUAS mapping with service providers being drug into the space by their customers. This is, ironically, not unlike the situation when tripod laser scanning was emerging. Service providers had big investments in total stations and had no burning desire to have to invest in a new technology.

We are changing our newsletter a bit with this issue. We will now be hosting information such as our tool tips and how-to articles in our new GeoCue Group knowledge base. We will put a lead-in sentence in this newsletter that will link you to the knowledge base article. This will be a real benefit as time goes on. The Knowledge Base includes a robust search capability and consolidates all of this rich information in one spot. This means that if you need to review our extensive past article on breaklines, you can simply search the knowledge base rather than digging through the newsletter archive. We are gradually moving all of the past technical articles over to the knowledge base.

We continue to focus a lot of our development efforts on LP360. These developments range from ease of use to advanced methods for creating the toes of stockpiles for volumetric analysis. In addition, we have been tuning our display subsystem to increase window refresh times and reduce our memory footprint. Finally, we are adding (to the Standard level) a new point cloud task for cleaning up areas where batch ground classification did not quite do the job.  We will be posting an “Experimental” release of LP360 within the next several weeks that provides initial versions of these features.

Thanks very much for being a GeoCue Group customer or an interested observer! See you in May.

Best Regards,

Lewis

GeoCue Group News – April 2015